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Dun
WRITTEN BY: Cheryl Sutor   [January 2000]


Dun horses have a sandy/yellow to reddish/brown coat. Their legs are usually darker than their body and sometimes have faint "zebra" stripes on them. Dun horses always have a "dorsal" stripe, which is a dark stripe down the middle of their back. Sometimes the dorsal stripe continues down the horse's dock and tail, and through the mane. Many dun colored horses also have face masking, which makes the horse's nose and sometimes the rest of the face a darker color than the horse's body.



Horse: Mimado   © Pat Fausser
Tamarack Stables Rivers Edge
Typical Dun:

Both of these horses are a typical dun color, with a dorsal stripe down the middle of the back, with the legs a darker color than the body color. On the horse to the left, the dorsal stripe continues through the horse's tail.


Horse: Bubba Dun   © Cheryl McNamee

Bay Dun:

This horse is a bay dun. Bay duns have a bay color, but they are not bay since they have the dun characteristic of a dorsal stripe down the middle of their back. An uneducated horse-person might think this is a buckskin, but we know better!

Horse: Blundur   © Tim Kvick


Horse: Fifill   © Tim Kvick

Red Dun:

This horse is a dun, but with reddish/chestnut highlights. He has a dorsal stripe down the middle of the back, and the legs a darker color than the body color.


Horse: Mimado   © Pat Fausser
Tamarack Stables Rivers Edge

Zebra Stripes:

Some dun colored horses also have primitive zebra markings on their legs, such as this one.

More Dun Pictures:


Horse: Zipalong Drifta   © Heather Cook

Horse: Zipalong Drifta   © Heather Cook



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This article was published on: January 2000. Last updated on: January 2000.